The Publicness of Clock Time — Communication: Reflections on Niklas Luhmann’s Social Systems Theory

In late medieval and early modern Europe, a central dimension of timekeeping was its ‘publicness’: clock time was essentially, and explicitly, a public concept. Clock time revolved around public devices and public practices, rather than being something that was kept privately. Yet this central public dimension of timekeeping is almost entirely absent from a horological […]

via The Publicness of Clock Time — Communication: Reflections on Niklas Luhmann’s Social Systems Theory

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